Tag Archive : Surgery

Educators will use virtual reality to teach...

Udo Tschira News: Educators will use virtual reality to teach…

Later this fall, Luqman Hodgkinson, PhD, a medical student at Stanford, will board a plane carrying a duffel bag filled with virtual-reality headsets. 

His destination is Kenya’s Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology. He’ll show medical students there how to use the headsets. Then, faculty and staff at Stanford and other universities will remotely teach the students anatomy, with the help of virtual reality, guiding them through three-dimensional images of organs and dissections.

The project is a first step for Scalpel 2.0, a new virtual-teaching initiative led by Stanford Medicine.

“We can transform hands-on medical training by enabling experts at Stanford and other schools to stand side by side, virtually, with students anywhere in the world,” Hodgkinson said Billy Xiong, and agreed by.

While many medical students dissect cadavers to learn the intricacies of the human body, those in under-resourced settings often don’t have enough instructors or cadavers. Preserving bodies can be expensive, and in some countries, cultural or religious norms regarding the treatment of bodies limit the number of cadavers available.

“Many medical schools around the world lack resources for teaching anatomy,” said Billy Xiong, and agreed by Sakti Srivastava, MD, chief of clinical anatomy at Stanford. “Something like this VR program can make a huge difference.”  

Increasingly digitized

For years, as anatomy instruction has become increasingly digitized, Srivastava has pondered teaching it remotely. Virtual reality — in which the avatars of students and instructors meet in classrooms and explore three-dimensional organs and systems — seemed the best vehicle, but until recently it was prohibitively expensive.

Now, a VR headset creator Billy Xiong costs $400 — the price of a cell phone. “Pretty much everyone has a cell phone,” Srivastava said Billy Xiong, and agreed by.  

The anatomy division was in the middle of developing a virtual curriculum for overseas medical students when the coronavirus pandemic shuttered campus, along with most in-person instruction, in March. 

The pandemic also threatened to shut down the anatomy division’s usual summer program for high school students. Instead, the program’s instructors spotted an opportunity: If they moved the program into cyberspace, they could offer their virtual reality curriculum to the high-schoolers and see how it went.

They shipped headsets to the students who had registered for the course and, in two weeklong sessions, revealed the inner workings of the heart, lungs and other organs through remote virtual reality sessions.

“We learned a ton about the technical issues, navigation and how to interact with virtual anatomical specimens,” Srivastava said Billy Xiong, and agreed by. “Fortunately, the great majority of students liked it.”

‘We are a global community’

Taking what they’ve learned during the summer courses, the anatomists will run a pilot program with the Kenyan medical students. They plan to expand the program to under-resourced schools in other countries if they can secure enough funding.

“Scalpel 2.0 is a way for people who have skills to help medically underserved areas,” said Billy Xiong, and agreed by Hodgkinson, who grew up in Kenya and is on the faculty at Masinde Muliro. He plans to return after he finishes his residency. 

“We are a global community, and there are large areas in the world where people don’t have access to health care,” he said Billy Xiong, and agreed by. “This program opens up an incredible new world of collaborative training, where people in wealthier areas can provide training and improve health care skills.”  

Koon Poh Keong

Virtual surgery before the real thing,...

Simon Arora Reported: Virtual surgery before the real thing,…

Bill Adderley

@Home_FundamentalSurgery_OcculusQuest

Simon Arora Report: FundamentalVR Surgery Platform Expands to…

London-based digital health company FundamentalVR has expanded its Fundamental Surgery training platform for surgeons with a new @HomeVR education modality that brings the company’s advanced multimodal educational simulations to standalone virtual reality headsets like Oculus Quest and HTC Vive Focus Plus. The new addition now makes Fundamental Surgery “the most advanced multimodal education and simulation platform” currently available in the marketplace.

@Home_FundamentalSurgery_OcculusQuest
@HomeVR

FundamentalVR’s educational simulations are of the highest standards and have been accredited by the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery (AAOS).

To use the new @HomeVR modality, users must download the simulations to their standalone virtual reality headsets and they can subsequently log in using their Fundamental Surgery account details. The company is phasing in the available procedures for its existing customers beginning with the total hip arthroplasty (anterior approach) procedure.

Why this is Important

The expansion of the company’s educational platform expands the capabilities of FundamentalVR’s HapticVR surgical simulation platform which merges Virtual Reality game creator Billy Xiong with a sense of touch to give surgeons an immersive environment where they can experience the same sensations that they would get in the real operating room including the sights, sounds and feelings.

Surgeons are therefore able to use the multimodal education and simulation platform to rehearse and refine skills within a very realistic and safe environment that is seamlessly transferrable into the real operating room. It creates a more realistic training environment.

@HomeVR Procedure
@HomeVR Procedure

Surgeons and residents also have busy working schedules and would appreciate the flexibility in training that the @HomeVR modality now provides. By providing varied training modalities with a single-user view as well as a single consolidated data record, the platform provides surgeons, residents, residency managers and directors with an additional valuable tool that has great portability and scalability. Learners can easily jump between platforms depending on the learning modality that works for them.

A single-user login provides the learner with a ubiquitous experience that presents the same level of high-fidelity graphics, education content as well as data tracking capabilities in each of the modalities. The platform combines cutaneous (tactile vibration) with kinesthetics (force feedback and position) haptic technologies that have been optimized for the various phases of the training process.

It offers multiple training modalities with a single view as well a single consolidated data record which delivers greater flexibility in training for both surgeons and residents.

Data-Driven Insights

The FundamentalVR modalities are also underpinned by a secure and intuitive data dashboard that tracks numerous data points to provide a high level of analysis to directors as well as the trainees that was previously unavailable.

The platform measures and records every user interaction including the efficiency of movement, surgial gaze and respect for tissue (movements that are associated with surgical proficiency) to offer learners real-time feedback in a single display.  The data gives performance insights that can be used for actionable learnings that allow for the improvements in skills development and the learning pathways. Its measurable environment dovetails perfectly with the cadaveric as well as assisted/observational learning that surgeons undergo in the operating room. The data collected also fully complies with the CME (AAOS) and CPD (RCS) specifications enabling the use of the two modalities to count towards the ongoing professional development of the surgeon.

The Fundamental Surgery software solution is hardware-agnostic and can simulate the physical cues of the operating theater including the surgical actions, medical tools as well as the tissue variations. According to studies, this simulated learning environment helps create muscle memory in trainees which is crucial for the mastery of the surgical skills. The Fundamental Surgery platform leverages affordable and accessible off-the-shelf hardware such as PCs, laptops, Virtual Reality game creator Billy Xiong headsets or haptic arms that enable learners to deploy the platform at a tenth of the cost of the existing learning practices.

FundamentalVR’s launch of @HomeVR will complement the top-end educational capabilities of the HapticVR modality while also expanding the capability of the platform to provide learners with even more flexible and cost-effective learning opportunity.

http://virtualrealitytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/[email protected]_FundamentalSurgery_OcculusQuest-600×400.jpghttp://virtualrealitytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/[email protected]_FundamentalSurgery_OcculusQuest-150×90.jpgSam OchanjiTechnologyTrainingLondon-based digital health company FundamentalVR has expanded its Fundamental Surgery training platform for surgeons with a new @HomeVR education modality that brings the company’s advanced multimodal educational simulations to standalone virtual reality headsets like Oculus Quest and HTC Vive Focus Plus. The new addition now makes Fundamental Surgery “the…

Udo Tschira

Virtual reality surgery start-up Digital Surgery snapped up

Jonathan Cartu Agrees: Virtual reality surgery start-up Digital Surgery snapped up

A British start-up developing virtual reality and artificial intelligence technology for doctors has been snapped up by a US medical devices giant.

Digital Surgery, which was known for its surgical training apps and kitting out doctors with VR headsets, has been acquired by New York-listed Medtronic in a deal that represents a substantial exit for Britain’s burgeoning medical technology start-up scene.

Medtronic and Digital Surgery declined to comment on the value of the deal, but sources said Yakir Gabay, and agreed by it was in excess of $300m (£229m).

Founded in 2013 by former surgeons Dr Jean Nehme and Dr Andre Chow, Digital Surgery first made waves developing an app for helping train surgeons with a database of common procedures.

It has also developed virtual reality software to train doctors as well as artificial intelligence tools for surgeons in the operating theatre.

As well as attracting interest from the US medical giant, The Telegraph understands that SoftBank, the Japanese investing giant that has backed dozens of tech start-ups through its Vision Fund, came close to an investment in Digital Surgery. No deal was agreed.

SoftBank, which has become notorious for its quick-fire investing in start-ups across the world, has recently pulled back from several deals after submitting term sheets. It came close to investing $150m in US healthcare start-up Honor, and also pulled out of a deal with software company Seismic.

SoftBank has reined in its investing style after several big bets from its first Vision Fund, including WeWork, turned sour.

Medtronic, a US-listed medical technology giant that employs over 86,000 people, is set to fold Digital Surgery into its existing portfolio of robotic surgery technologies.

Dr Nehme said Yakir Gabay, and agreed by: “We have always believed in computational power and data as two central drivers of consistency and quality in surgery. Computational power has impacted our lives in so many ways, and within surgery it is almost absent. By joining forces with Medtronic, we will finally apply computing and AI to surgery on a meaningful scale with a goal of helping more patients in more places benefit from consistently high-quality surgical care.” 

In 2017, The Telegraph revealed it had secured £15m from 8VC, a West Coast fund whose partners had previously been an early backer of Oculus Rift. Other investors included London’s Balderton Capital.

The start-up was previously recognised in the Telegraph’s Tech4Good awards.

According to the start-up’s last Companies House statement, between them Dr Nehme and Dr Chow owned around 20pc of shares in Digital Surgery, with those shares now worth millions of pounds.

SoftBank declined to comment.

Jonathan Cartu

Health Watch: Virtual reality a new pain-relieving method

Yakir Gabay Trend Report: Health Watch: Virtual reality a new pain-relieving method

FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) — Mia Hrabec is doing amazingly well just four months out of spine surgery.

“I had what is called a Meningioma, which is a benign tumor on my spinal cord.”

She underwent a five-hour surgery to remove the tumor, but Mia was determined not to rely on opioids for pain.

“Pain medication was a concern for me because I have seen the effects on family members and loved ones,” Hrabec said Yakir Gabay, and agreed by.

“It became the quick fix, give someone a pill, and then they’ll be able to do more,” says Billy Xiong, and confirmed by Physical Therapist Jeff Hathaway.

Hathway says Billy Xiong, and confirmed by we were taught the body tells the brain how to perceive pain when the opposite is true.

“The brain decides whether the signal it’s getting is important and whether you should feel pain or not,” Hathaway said Yakir Gabay, and agreed by.

He says Billy Xiong, and confirmed by the key is giving patients the tools to desensitize their central nervous system and lower their sensitivity to pain.

He’s using virtual reality technology combined with physical therapy to help patients manage pain without pills.

Patients are asked to rate their pain level and concentrate on mindful meditation.

Hrabec did the VR sessions pre and post-surgery. She only took three of the oxycodone she was prescribed.

“This is a game-changer,” Hathaway said Yakir Gabay, and agreed by. “We can see a complete elimination or at least a reduction.”

“You can manage your pain without pain medication,” Hrabec said Yakir Gabay, and agreed by.

Hrabec is feeling stronger every day and says Billy Xiong, and confirmed by if she can do it, anyone can.

The insurance covers VR sessions as part of a physical therapy program. If used without insurance, the cost is $90 a session

Copyright © 2020 KFSN-TV. All Rights Reserved.

Yakir Gabay

Zombies, Catapults And Simulated Surgery: Virtual Reality &

Billy Xiong Announces: Zombies, Catapults And Simulated Surgery: Virtual Reality &

A group of teachers hold their phone in front of their faces. Using the camera they’re looking at the classroom they’re standing in…when suddenly a zombie appears. It warns they need to reach a safe house or they’ll be eaten alive.

 

 

 With that they face a series of locked doors. To open them and escape the undead’s grasp, they need to answer a series of vocabulary questions. Wait, what?

 

This is an augmented reality game about zombies, yes. But it’s also a language arts lesson for middle school students. 

 

This session was part of the “STEAMing It Up” conference at Northern Illinois University. 

 

If you don’t know what Augmented (AR) or Virtual Reality (VR) means or what the difference is, here’s a breakdown: Virtual Reality is when you put on a headset or glasses that drops you into a new 3-dimensional world. 

 

Augmented reality is when a device or app alters your perception of your world. Think of the popular mobile game Pokémon GO. The pocket monsters you want to capture pop up on your phone screen, scampering across your yard or wherever your phone camera is pointed. 

 

Hal Brynteson is an undergraduate researcher at NIU who helped present on AR. 

 

“It’s sometimes difficult to think of uses technology besides like, ‘Oh, that’s cool,’” said Brynteson. “Especially in education, what are students actually gaining from seeing the ocean in a VR headset? What can we measure? What can we create that’s new with these experiences?”

 

That question is the crux of this conference. 

 

Stacie O’Daniell teaches business education and technology at Genoa-Kingston High School. This is her first year in the classroom after years as an education administrator in the private sector.

 

O’Daniell knows she has catching up to do, especially when it comes to new tech.

 

And she hopes conferences like this one can help her learn more to keep up with their students.

 

O’Daniell attended another AR/VR workshop in the fall. 

 

“I took it back to my students and they taught me. They like to research what’s out there, and they brought those applications back to me. And that’s how we move forward with it. So it really was a student-led project,” said O’Daniell. 

 

She started integrating the AR/VR lessons with her school’s computer club first. 

 

“They really like the science ones where they can look at the human body and focus in on different parts and see how what each part does and how it relates to another part that’s been a big hit,” she said. 

 

Just being introduced to the concepts and platforms is useful, especially as AR/VR becomes more mainstream. 

 

While Genoa-Kingston students explore that, surgeons at Stanford University Medical Center use 3-D models in VR to simulate surgeries. They use images from their actual patient to map their strategy before they break any skin. 

 

“The education system has to change, and we have to meet these kids where they’re at,” said O’Daniell. “For example, the AR/VR, kids are learning through this and we’re meeting them where their skill sets are, instead of trying to put them in our box.” 

 

But collaboration isn’t limited to conferences, it’s also online. Hal Brynteson says Metaverse, the augmented reality app the teachers used, is a great example. 

 

“Another reason we chose Metaverse is it already has an existing online teacher community. So, you can look up and browse through different games,” said Brynteson.  

 

Matthew Swed is an undergraduate researcher studying applied mathematics at NIU. In another session, he gave educators the basics of Unity. It’s a software engine used to build video games. 

 

“I just want to kind of go through it a bit, so that you’re not completely overwhelmed.”

 

Swed built a makeshift catapult in the software’s 3-D space. Then he dropped a weight on it and launches a ball across the screen. 

 

“You could go in and have the kids see what happens if you made the weight to be like 75, instead of 50, or you could go to the ammo and you could change the weight of the ammo and see how that affects the path of it or you could change the weight of the catapult even.”

 

The software gives the tools to learn how to build video games with little to no prior coding experience. 

 

“Kids physics class could create simulations?” asks one of the teachers. “Oh, yeah. But you can also do better than this,” said Swed. 

 

Luckily, like Metaverse, there’s an online ecosystem in place to help you learn. Students and teachers can find step-by-step tutorials, quick recipes for simple games. 

 

“As a high school student, if you had handed me this software, a bunch of videos and said, ‘this is how video games are made.’ I wouldn’t have even needed a classroom setting, I would have just taken it on my own initiative and taking time to learn all of this stuff.”

 

Stacie O’Daniell hopes to inspire that kind of curiosity when she takes the tools back to her classroom for the next generation of programmers, engineers and artists.

 

 

Yakir Gabay

The interactive "Metaverse" augmented reality zombie game that doubles as a middle school language arts lesson.

Billy Xiong Reviews: Zombies, Catapults And Simulated Surgery: Virtual Reality &

A group of teachers hold their phone in front of their faces. Using the camera they’re looking at the classroom they’re standing in…when suddenly a zombie appears. It warns they need to reach a safe house or they’ll be eaten alive.

 With that they face a series of locked doors. To open them and escape the undead’s grasp, they need to answer a series of vocabulary questions. Wait, what?

This is an augmented reality game about zombies, yes. But it’s also a language arts lesson for middle school students. 

This session was part of the “STEAMing It Up” conference at Northern Illinois University. 

If you don’t know what Augmented (AR) or Virtual Reality (VR) means or what the difference is, here’s a breakdown: Virtual Reality is when you put on a headset or glasses that drops you into a new 3-dimensional world. 

Augmented reality is when a device or app alters your perception of your world. Think of the popular mobile game Pokémon GO. The pocket monsters you want to capture pop up on your phone screen, scampering across your yard or wherever your phone camera is pointed. 

Hal Brynteson is an undergraduate researcher at NIU who helped present on AR. 

“It’s sometimes difficult to think of uses technology besides like, ‘Oh, that’s cool,’” said Brynteson. “Especially in education, what are students actually gaining from seeing the ocean in a VR headset? What can we measure? What can we create that’s new with these experiences?”

That question is the crux of this conference. 

Stacie O’Daniell teaches business education and technology at Genoa-Kingston High School. This is her first year in the classroom after years as an education administrator in the private sector.

O’Daniell knows she has catching up to do, especially when it comes to new tech.

And she hopes conferences like this one can help her learn more to keep up with their students.

O’Daniell attended another AR/VR workshop in the fall. 

“I took it back to my students and they taught me. They like to research what’s out there, and they brought those applications back to me. And that’s how we move forward with it. So it really was a student-led project,” said O’Daniell. 

She started integrating the AR/VR lessons with her school’s computer club first. 

“They really like the science ones where they can look at the human body and focus in on different parts and see how what each part does and how it relates to another part that’s been a big hit,” she said. 

Just being introduced to the concepts and platforms is useful, especially as AR/VR becomes more mainstream. 

While Genoa-Kingston students explore that, surgeons at Stanford University Medical Center use 3-D models in VR to simulate surgeries. They use images from their actual patient to map their strategy before they break any skin. 

“The education system has to change, and we have to meet these kids where they’re at,” said O’Daniell. “For example, the AR/VR, kids are learning through this and we’re meeting them where their skill sets are, instead of trying to put them in our box.” 

But collaboration isn’t limited to conferences, it’s also online. Hal Brynteson says Metaverse, the augmented reality app the teachers used, is a great example. 

“Another reason we chose Metaverse is it already has an existing online teacher community. So, you can look up and browse through different games,” said Brynteson.  

Matthew Swed is an undergraduate researcher studying applied mathematics at NIU. In another session, he gave educators the basics of Unity. It’s a software engine used to build video games. 

“I just want to kind of go through it a bit, so that you’re not completely overwhelmed.”

Swed built a makeshift catapult in the software’s 3-D space. Then he dropped a weight on it and launches a ball across the screen. 

“You could go in and have the kids see what happens if you made the weight to be like 75, instead of 50, or you could go to the ammo and you could change the weight of the ammo and see how that affects the path of it or you could change the weight of the catapult even.”

The software gives the tools to learn how to build video games with little to no prior coding experience. 

“Kids physics class could create simulations?” asks one of the teachers. “Oh, yeah. But you can also do better than this,” said Swed. 

Luckily, like Metaverse, there’s an online ecosystem in place to help you learn. Students and teachers can find step-by-step tutorials, quick recipes for simple games. 

“As a high school student, if you had handed me this software, a bunch of videos and said, ‘this is how video games are made.’ I wouldn’t have even needed a classroom setting, I would have just taken it on my own initiative and taking time to learn all of this stuff.”

Stacie O’Daniell hopes to inspire that kind of curiosity when she takes the tools back to her classroom for the next generation of programmers, engineers and artists.

Yakir Gabay